Saturday, February 8, 2020

Financial Reporting and Analysis Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1000 words - 2

Financial Reporting and Analysis - Essay Example n laid down by the IASB and the FASB together with the intension of providing a sound future for the accounting standards which have moved to becoming more principals based, internally consistent and internationally converged. This paper has also dealt with the pros and cons of this framework and the agreements are based around the ‘international’ conceptual framework. The IASB is a board which aims at developing and helping to improve the general purpose financial statements, to make sure that it meets to the public interest (Mill, et.al., 2003). The IASB is one of the single high qualities, simple to understand and also one of the only global accounting standards which needs complete information of the general purpose financial statements. The International Accounting Standard Board (IASB) has made various proposals to improve the conceptual framework for financial reporting. The International Accounting Standard Board has proposed to improvise the objectives of the General Purpose Financial Reports (Kitabjian, 2008). The International Accounting Standard Board has focused on improving the General Purpose Financial Reports for potential investors and lenders. They suggest that the report aims at these groups of individuals to help them make informed decisions regarding their capital investments (IASB, 2008). The IASB also works in cooperation wi th the national accounting standard setters which provides for a meeting point for all the accounting standards from across the world. The use of fair value as opposed to the historical cost accounting has always been quite a controversial choice. In this case the use of fair value would prove to be more beneficial when compared to the historical cost accounting as this would have reduced the impact of the credit crunch. In the time of a credit problem and a troubled economy, the use of fair value is one which is most beneficial. The use of fair value is beneficial majorly because the use of the fair value provides

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Corporate social responsibility Essay Example for Free

Corporate social responsibility Essay 1) Corporate Ethics The broad area dealing with the way in which a company behaves towards, and conducts business with, its internal and external STAKEHOLDERS, including employees, investors, creditors, customers, and regulators. In certain national systems minimum standards are required or recommended in order to eliminate potential conflicts of interest or client/employee mistreatment. 2) Board of Directors (BOD) An appointed or elected body or committee that has overall responsibility for the management of a nonprofit or nonstock organization, such as a foundation, university or mutual fund. 3) Executive Officer is generally a person responsible for running an organization, although the exact nature of the role varies depending on the organization. 4) Corporate Compliance means having internal policies and procedures designed to prevent and detect violations of applicable law, regulations, rules and ethical standards by employees, agents and others. It involves legal risk management and internal controls. 5) Corporate Governance refers to the set of systems, principles and processes by which a company is governed. They provide the guidelines as to how the company can be directed or controlled such that it can fulfil its goals and objectives in a manner that adds to the value of the company and is also beneficial for all stakeholders in the long term. 6) Corporate Responsibility includes being consistent with ethical principles and conduct such as honesty, integrity and respect for others. By voluntarily accepting responsibility for its actions corporations earn their licence to operate in society. 7) Corporate Social Responsibility is a form of corporate self-regulation integrated into a business model. CSR policy functions as a built-in, self-regulating mechanism whereby a business monitors and ensures its active compliance with the spirit of the law, ethical standards, and international norms. 8) Corporate Sustainability is a business approach that creates long-term consumer and employee value by not only creating a green strategy aimed towards the natural environment, but taking into consideration every dimension of how a business operates in the social, cultural, and economic environment. Also formulating strategies to build a company that fosters longevity through transparency and proper employee development.

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

Finding Meaning in The Turn of The Screw, by Henry James Essay

  Ã‚  Ã‚   At first glance, Bly appears to be a rather lonely place. The vividly bleak backdrop for The Turn of the Screw houses a handful of servants, two orphaned children, and ghosts who fade in and out of view. But there are others present who are less obtrusive yet just as influential as Peter Quint and Miss Jessel. Peering into and out of Bly's windows and mirrors, engaging with the text and the lingering trace of author Henry James, a crowd of real and virtual readers hope to catch a glimpse of a specter or to unravel a clever Freudian slipknot that will tell them something: They may be looking for that which they think James intended as the text's truth - a transcendental center - or maybe they subconsciously wish to see a reflection of themselves, somehow transformed by the reading, smiling back from the gilded, glassy panes. Whatever they are seeking, this crew of interactive observers might be surprised to find out that there is not only one answer to James's literary mystery and that the worth of their readings centers on effect, not meaning. It is futile to seek the "answer" that is supposed to tell because, as Douglas forewarns, "the story won't tell." The langue of Bly is based on deceptions and ambiguities, ways in which "truth" is kept at bay. But many readers are unaware that they are really seeking effect, and thus experience effect only when they think they are searching for meaning. Whatever the motivation, the pack should not be deterred from the quest, for the creation that Wolfgang Iser calls the text's "esthetic pole," --its true value--depends upon a conscientious reader to notice the text's gaps and ambiguities, fill in some of the holes, and to revel in the pleasure, finally, ... ...ist's dream, how reassuring for everyone else that it will never happen.    Works Cited    Felman, Shoshana. "Henry James: Madness and the Risks of Practice." 1977. The Turn of the Screw. Ed. Deborah Esch and Jonathan Warren. 2nd ed. New York: Norton, 1999. 196-228.    Iser, Wolfgang. "The Reading Process." Reader Response Criticism. 1974. Ed. Jane Tompkins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 1980. 50-68.    James, Henry. The Turn of the Screw. Ed. Deborah Esch and Jonathan Warren. 2nd ed. New York: Norton, 1999.    Lustig, T.J. "Henry James and the Ghostly." 1994. The Turn of the Screw. Ed. Deborah Esch and Jonathan Warren. 2nd ed. New York: Norton, 1999. 255-60.    Tompkins, Jane. "The Reader in History." Reader Response Criticism. Ed. Jane Tompkins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 1980. 201-26.    Finding Meaning in The Turn of The Screw, by Henry James Essay   Ã‚  Ã‚   At first glance, Bly appears to be a rather lonely place. The vividly bleak backdrop for The Turn of the Screw houses a handful of servants, two orphaned children, and ghosts who fade in and out of view. But there are others present who are less obtrusive yet just as influential as Peter Quint and Miss Jessel. Peering into and out of Bly's windows and mirrors, engaging with the text and the lingering trace of author Henry James, a crowd of real and virtual readers hope to catch a glimpse of a specter or to unravel a clever Freudian slipknot that will tell them something: They may be looking for that which they think James intended as the text's truth - a transcendental center - or maybe they subconsciously wish to see a reflection of themselves, somehow transformed by the reading, smiling back from the gilded, glassy panes. Whatever they are seeking, this crew of interactive observers might be surprised to find out that there is not only one answer to James's literary mystery and that the worth of their readings centers on effect, not meaning. It is futile to seek the "answer" that is supposed to tell because, as Douglas forewarns, "the story won't tell." The langue of Bly is based on deceptions and ambiguities, ways in which "truth" is kept at bay. But many readers are unaware that they are really seeking effect, and thus experience effect only when they think they are searching for meaning. Whatever the motivation, the pack should not be deterred from the quest, for the creation that Wolfgang Iser calls the text's "esthetic pole," --its true value--depends upon a conscientious reader to notice the text's gaps and ambiguities, fill in some of the holes, and to revel in the pleasure, finally, ... ...ist's dream, how reassuring for everyone else that it will never happen.    Works Cited    Felman, Shoshana. "Henry James: Madness and the Risks of Practice." 1977. The Turn of the Screw. Ed. Deborah Esch and Jonathan Warren. 2nd ed. New York: Norton, 1999. 196-228.    Iser, Wolfgang. "The Reading Process." Reader Response Criticism. 1974. Ed. Jane Tompkins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 1980. 50-68.    James, Henry. The Turn of the Screw. Ed. Deborah Esch and Jonathan Warren. 2nd ed. New York: Norton, 1999.    Lustig, T.J. "Henry James and the Ghostly." 1994. The Turn of the Screw. Ed. Deborah Esch and Jonathan Warren. 2nd ed. New York: Norton, 1999. 255-60.    Tompkins, Jane. "The Reader in History." Reader Response Criticism. Ed. Jane Tompkins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 1980. 201-26.   

Monday, January 13, 2020

Love and Diane Essay

Synopsis Love & Diane tells the epic story of a family over three generations. At its heart lies the highly charged relationship between a mother and daughter, desperate for love and forgiveness but caught in a devastating cycle. For Love, the world changed forever when she and her siblings were torn from their mother, Diane. Separated from her family and thrust into a terrifying world of institutions and foster homes, the memory of that moment is more vivid to her than her present life. Ten years have passed since that day and Love and her five siblings have been reunited with their mother. But all have been changed by the years of separation. They are almost strangers to each other and Love is tormented by the thought that it was her fault. At 8 years old she was the one who revealed to a teacher that her mother was an drug addict. Now she is 18 and HIV+. And she has just given birth to a son, Donyaeh. For Love & Diane this baby represents everything good and hopeful for the future. But that hope is mixed with fear. Donyaeh has been born with the HIV virus and months must pass before his final status is known. As Diane struggles to make her family whole again and to realize some of her own dreams, Love seems to be drifting further and further away from her child. Diane, torn by her own guilt over her children’s fate when she was an addict, tries to help and to care for her grandson. But when Diane confides her fears for her daughter to a therapist, the police suddenly appear at the door. Donyaeh is taken from Love’s arms and it seems to the family as if history has repeated itself. Now Love must face the same ordeal her mother had faced years before. She is charged with neglect and must prove to a world of social workers, therapists and prosecutors that she is a fit mother. And Diane must find the courage to turn away from her guilt and grasp a chance to pursue her long-deferred dreams. While the film takes us deep into the life of a single family, it also offers a provocative look at the Byzantine â€Å"system† that aims to help but as often frustrates the family’s attempts to improve their situation. The film differs from many documentaries that deal with the problems facing poor communities in that it eschews â€Å"talking eads† and interviews with â€Å"experts† and aims instead to immerse the viewer in the experiences and thoughts of a family trying to survive and retain autonomy in the face of terrible challenges. Love ; Diane: Inner-City Blues: An Interview with Jennifer Dworkin For over eight years Jennifer Dworkin documented the personal struggles of a recovering crack addict and her troubled daughter in Love ; Diane. Fellow â€Å"long-term† filmmaker Steve James talks with Dworkin about her epic work of American v’rit’ filmmaking. I first heard about Jennifer Dworkin’s Love & Diane when it played at the 2002 New York Film Festival. Though I missed seeing it because I live in Chicago, the word was that this was a special film, one in which the filmmaker spent years intimately following the lives of a family. Since that’s been my own filmmaking â€Å"M. O. ,† I knew this was a documentary I had to see. So in November, when I finally did settle into my seat at Amsterdam’s International Documentary Festival to watch the film, I had pretty high expectations. Love & Diane lived up to them and more. It’s a powerful, uncompromising, yet compassionate portrait of a mother and daughter coping with a hard life in Brooklyn and an even more difficult personal history between them. In the best sense of the word, the film is a throwback to the heyday of cinema v’rit’ filmmaking in the ’60s and early ’70s, When the Maysles were in their prime and young filmmakers like Barbara Kopple were making their mark. Love ; Diane is one of those films where the filmmaker earned such intimate access and the trust of her subjects that it gives viewers a rare and complex glimpse into the lives of people we rarely really see in films. And like most great film subjects, Diane Hazzard and her daughter, Love, continually confound our expectations of what it means to be a â€Å"ghetto mom† or an â€Å"ex-crack addict† or a â€Å"black teenage mother. † Meeting and getting to know the director, Jennifer Dworkin, was one of the pleasures of the Amsterdam festival. My film, Stevie, also played there, and Jennifer and I found unexpected common ground in the stories each of our films tells. Both films deal with troubled family history, struggles between a parent and child, foster care, poverty and the social service and legal systems. Yet, in other ways, Stevie and Love ; Diane, couldn’t be more different. Filmmaker gave me a chance to talk further with Jennifer about her impressive first film and compare notes about how we each went about making such demanding and challenging films. Steve James: How long did you spend on this film? Jennifer Dworkin: You know, I never answer that question. James: Really? Dworkin: No, just kidding [laughs]. If you count directions I started but didn’t end up using in the film, about eight years, including editing. But not full time. James: Of course not. How could one survive? Dworkin: Exactly.

Sunday, January 5, 2020

Social and Ethical Technology Concerns-Biotechnology

Social and Ethical Technology Concerns-Biotechnology Biotechnology is technology based on living organisms. It harnesses cellular and biomolecular processes to develop technologies or products which are immensely useful to mankind. Biotechnology modifies living organisms according to our needs. Humans have employed this tool in the fields of agriculture, food industry and medicine for more than 6000 years. We see numerous biotechnological applications in our every-day life. Preparation of food products like bread, cheese and preservatives in dairy products are all outcomes of this great scientific tool (Biotechnology Industry Organization). Modern biotechnological research has created wonders for mankind. It has provided products to combat rare diseases, vaccines for untreatable diseases, food for the hungry and a safer, cleaner environment to our planet. Biotechnology has played a vital role in reducing the green house effect and in producing a cleaner planet. Because of the worldwide economic and environmental concerns regarding the use of petro-chemicals, extensive research has been conducted on residual biomass. Significant progress has been made in the field of lignocellulose biotechnology. Lignocellulosic waste materials have been used in the production of bio-fuels, enzymes, chemicals, the pulp and paper, animal feed and composites (Iqbal, 2013). Moreover, algal biomass has received huge attention in producing biofuels due to their relatively high growth rate, greatShow MoreRelatedEssay about Sci 115 Week 8 Assignment 2 Gene Technology1132 Words   |  5 PagesSCI 115 WEEK 8 ASSIGNMENT 2 GENE TECHNOLOGY To purchase this visit here: http://www.activitymode.com/product/sci-115-week-8-assignment-2-gene-technology/ Contact us at: SUPPORT@ACTIVITYMODE.COM SCI 115 WEEK 8 ASSIGNMENT 2 GENE TECHNOLOGY SCI 115 Week 8 Assignment 2 - Gene Technology Gene technology carries with it social and ethical implications—many of which engender personal views and discussion. Select one (1) of the following biotechnology topics to write about: †¢ GeneticallyRead MoreModern Food Biotechnology, Human Health And Development : An Evidence Based Stud1561 Words   |  7 PagesModern Food Biotechnology, Human Health and Development: An Evidence-Based Stud Food security is a recurrent issue in modern society due to the continual increase in human population. 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Saturday, December 28, 2019

Perso-Islamic Synthesis Essay - 2775 Words

The purpose of this essay is to discuss the Islamization of Persia in relation to the Samanid and Buyid Dynasties. The synthesis of Persian culture and Islam was not an immediate result of the Arab expansion into Iran and there is certainly a lack of research on the subject. However, in this essay, I will attempt to explain the contributions of the Samanid and Buyid dynasties to this synthesis with a focus on the attempts of the Samanid Dynasty at centralization and a unified identity through religion, language and culture. The Islamization of Iran occurred as a result of the Arab conquest of Persia. The institution of a new culture, especially if the new culture is being installed by one less organized or less capable than the culture†¦show more content†¦This period marked significant changes for Persia since there was a large movement of immigration directed towards the region from the Arabian Peninsula. After Persia was conquered, the people began to convert to Islam and landowners gave their properties to Islam and were granted even more land as a result of the conversion. Further, the Zoroastrians were in fact the ones most enraged by the conversion to Islam as they were involved in occupations that involved impurities such as working with fire, etc. Missionaries did not really encounter much opposition as it became quite easy to convert the Persians into Islam alluding to the fact that there were already many similarities and that transforming, or converting, was really not such a hard task. Muslim leaders would also win conversions by attending public Muslim prayers, promising money and allowing for the Qur’an to be recited in Persian and not Arabic, so that all could understand what the Qur’an was really trying to say. The Samanids, who were originally based in the Zoroastrian nobility, started their own conversion process encouraging people become Sunni Muslims. In fact, during the reign of the Samanids in the 9th century, the Qur’an was translated into Persian completely. The Buyid Dynasty The Buyid Dynasty, originated from the Daylam in Galian, is considered the Shi’ite Persian dynasty. They controlled most of Iran and Iraq during the 10th and 11th century. TheShow MoreRelatedHindi : The Cultural And Linguistic Phenomenon2313 Words   |  10 PagesWord borrowing is a common linguistic phenomenon. However, there is no denying the fact that for most lexical borrowing a socio-cultural and linguistic interaction between two or more linguistic communities is essential. The contact with Arabs and Islamic culture had exercised an immense impact on the socio-cultural life of the Muslims in Indian subcontinent. The interaction of Muslim army: Arabs, Iranian, Turks, Afghans resulted into arrival in the Indian Territory which later became the basis forRead MoreMughal Empire3693 Words   |  15 Pageszenith; constructed the Taj Mahal, Jama Masjid, Red Fort, Jahangir mausoleum, and Shalimar Gardens in Lahore. Deposed and imprisoned by his son Aurangzeb. Mohiuddin Muhammad Aurangzeb Alamgir Oct 21, 1618 1658–1707 Mar 3, 1707 He reinterpreted Islamic law and presented the Fatawa-e-Alamgiri; he captured the diamond mines of the Sultanate of Golconda; he spent more than 20 years of his life defeating major rebel factions in India; his conquests expanded the empire to its greatest extent; the over-stretched

Friday, December 20, 2019

Robert Frosts Poems Essay - 460 Words

Robert Frosts Poems Robert frost has many themes in his poetry. One of the main themes that is always repeated, is nature. He always discusses how beautiful nature is or how distructive it can be. Frost always discusses nature in his poems. First, in the poem Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening there is a lot of nature expresses. Frosts very first sentence already talks about the woods. whose woods these are I think I know (Ln 1, 1105). Also, in the poem he states that the narrator likes to sit and watch the snow. He is also a nature lover. In the second stanza Frost refers back to the woods. He must also like ice, because he brings ice and cold up a lot in his poems. Once again Frost brings ice up when he†¦show more content†¦Second, in the poem Once by the Pacific there is a lot of nature expressed. Frost changes his natures view from woods to water. In this poem he now talks about water. The reader can see how powerful the water is when it eats away at the cliff. The shore was lucky by being backed by the cliff(ln 8, 1107). Once again Frost is discussing water which goes back to stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening by stating the water because there is water in this poem with snow Frost keeps bringing up water and snow. Water is a sign of being powerful, Frost must love having power by showing it with water. He also shows how powerful water is by tearing away at the cliff. Third, in the poem The Most of it there is also a lot of nature being expressed. You can see in this poem Frost refers back to the cliff which is in the fifth sentence of the poem, Some morning from the boulder broken beach(ln 5, 1112). He also talks about the water again and how powerful it is. Frost loves to write about water and how powerful it is in this poem and in many others of his. Frost always expresses nature in his poems. The reader can tell that Frost does love water. He also likes the power of it and expressing ot through nature. He also brings up other points of nature, but it always has water. The water is always breaking down cliffs, beaches and boulders. Frosts poems are similar but are also very different, but theyShow MoreRelatedEssay on Robert Frosts Poem Fire and Ice822 Words   |  4 PagesRobert Frosts Poem Fire and Ice If you had a choice on how the world would end, what would you choose? Would your choice to be go painfully but fast? Perhaps you would rather it be so slow and painless you do not even realize it is happening? Thats what I believe Robert Frosts poem Fire and Ice is meant to express. Although the poem is short, it holds a very interesting question to think about. The question is which way would you rather the world come to an end. There are two choices. Read MoreEssay about Nature in Robert Frosts Poems1649 Words   |  7 Pagesthe stars of the sky, fifteen-year old Robert Frost explored the heavens through a telescope. He was seeking affirmation of the proverbial question that has plagued mankind for centuries—the proof and existence of God. While surveying the cosmos, Frost‘s interest was stirred, so he visited a library and obtained books that had illustrated star charts. Within these pages, his knowledge of the stars was edified and a poet was born. Frost‘s first poems were ―astronomicalâ€â€" and invoked a kinshipRead More Robert Frost’s Poem, The Road Not Taken Essay535 Words   |  3 Pages Robert Frost’s poem, The Road Not Taken, is a descriptive poem about a person’s conflict with the right path to take throughout life. The choice that this person makes can affect him forever. There are lots of choices like this throughout a person’s life that are made that piece together the future. What they do with these choices and the decisions they make are up to them. Although the narrator of this poem is faced with a dilemma, he still makes the best decision possible and takes the best roadRead More Analysis of Robert Frosts Poem, Departmental Essay742 Words   |  3 Pages Analysis of Robert Frosts Poem, Departmental â€Å"Departmental† by Robert Frost is a poem written in rhymed couplets with three beats per line (trimeter). Throughout the poem, Frost uses poetic devices such as personification, allusion, rhyme, and alliteration. The poem as a whole serves as a metaphor for the way humans deal with issues like death.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  The poem begins with a description of a scene familiar to many, â€Å"an ant on a tablecloth†¦Ã¢â‚¬  Then the ant bumps into a day drowsy moth that is muchRead More Interpretations of Robert Frosts Poem, Design Essay1089 Words   |  5 PagesInterpretations of Robert Frosts Poem, Design The poem Design explores whether the events in nature are simply random occurrences or part of a larger plan by God, and if theres a force that dominates and controls our very existence. On that point both Jere K Huzzard and Everett Carter aggress on. They differ in their interpretations of the poems ending and what they think Frost wanted to convey with his vague ending. Both agree that the last line of the poem was written in an undefinedRead More Robert Frosts Poem The Road Not Taken Essay1056 Words   |  5 PagesRobert Frosts Poem The Road Not Taken The poem â€Å"The Road Not Taken† by Robert Frost addresses the idea of decision-making and choosing what direction life will take you. The poem is about the speaker arriving at a fork in the road, where both paths are carpeted with leaves. The persona, who is believed to be Frost himself, chooses to take the road less traveled by. He tells himself that he will take the other road another day, although he knows it is unlikely that he will have the opportunityRead More Class Struggle in Robert Frosts Poem Out, Out Essay1676 Words   |  7 PagesClass Struggle in Robert Frosts Poem Out, Out- Robert Frosts poem Out, Out- is developed around a clear and unquestionable moment: a horrifying accident in which a young boy is mutilated by a buzz saw. Frosts underlying message, however, isnt nearly as straightforward. As the poem develops, two clear levels of interpretation seem to surface. While on the basic level the poem would seem to be a simple metaphor for mans struggles with nature, a more careful analysis suggests a level ofRead More Societal Barriers in Robert Frosts Poem The Mending Wall Essay980 Words   |  4 PagesSocietal Barriers in Robert Frosts Poem The Mending Wall The Mending Wall by Robert Frost is one of the poems in his collection that he wrote after his encounters with back- country, New England farmers. The poem centers on a wall that separates one neighbor from the other. The introduction to the wall describes the large gaps in need of repair that appear after hunters accidentally shoot the wall while hunting rabbits. The narrator then lets his neighbor know that the wall is in needRead MoreOf Discovery In Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening, And Robert Frosts Poems1093 Words   |  5 Pageschallenge their perspective on themselves and the wider world. This idea of discovery offering new understandings and renewed perceptions of ourselves and others is reflected in the poem, ‘Stopping by Woods on A Snowy Evening’ by Robert Frost and the short story, ‘The Yellow Wallpaper’ by Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Robert Frost’s poetry reflects an enduring interest in how landscape can evoke contemplation and re flection about one’s place in society and the purpose of their existence. This idea is alsoRead MoreEssay on Analysis of Robert Frosts Poem, Nothing Gold Can Stay707 Words   |  3 PagesAnalysis of Robert Frosts Poem, Nothing Gold Can Stay Robert Frost has a fine talent for putting words into poetry. Words which are normally simplistic spur to life when he combines them into a whimsical poetic masterpiece. His Nothing Gold Can Stay poem is no exception. Although short, it drives home a deep point and meaning. Life is such a fragile thing and most of it is taken for granted. The finest, most precious time in life generally passes in what could be the blink of an eye.